Amazing Stories for Curious Minds

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Latest Stories by Viktor Jovanoski

The Cobra Effect by Odd Feed

The Cobra Effect: Lessons in Unintended Consequences

When a plan to eradicate cobras in 19th-century Delhi backfired spectacularly, the incident became known as the “Cobra Effect.” It has since become a cautionary tale about the unintended consequences of well-meaning policies, and a reminder of the importance of understanding the systems within which we operate.


Mokusatsu by Odd Feed. (© Odd Feed)

Mokusatsu : the Word That Changed the Course of History

On July 28, 1945, in response to the Potsdam Declaration demanding Japan’s unconditional surrender, Japanese prime minister Kantarō Suzuki uttered a now-famous phrase: mokusatsu-suru. The phrase can be translated to mean either “ignore” or “no comment.” The Allies heard the former. The atomic bombs were dropped several days later.


An artist's imagining of the Euthanasia Coaster. In the words of celebrated neuroscientist Antonio Damasio, the Euthanasia Coaster—essentially, a 2010 quasi-kinetic sculpture—is “not fun at all as art, and is preposterous as a technical device. But it does work as provocation, regardless of intent.” And the intent? A death-themed amusement park. (© Odd Feed)

Euthanasia Coaster: The Ultimate Roller Coaster Ride

In the words of celebrated neuroscientist Antonio Damasio, the Euthanasia Coaster—essentially, a 2010 quasi-kinetic sculpture—is “not fun at all as art, and is preposterous as a technical device. But it does work as provocation, regardless of intent.” And the intent? A death-themed amusement park.


The Wolf Cat by Odd Feed (© Odd Feed)

Wolf Cat: the Dream Pet of Witches

In 2021, a Maine photographer was stunned to discover that her seemingly disease-infested kitten was, in fact, a rare breed: Lykoi, the wolf cat. It’s a fitting name, isn’t it? Just wait till you hear about her dog-like propensities!


In 1918, Austrian artist Oskar Kokoschka commissioned a life-sized sex doll of his former lover, Alma Mahler (widow of composer Gustav Mahler and then-wife of architect Walter Gropius). He dressed it in custom-made clothes and took it with him on trips, to cafés, and to the theater. He destroyed it publicly several years later, claiming it had “cured him of his passions." 

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